Menu
Contribute to the Blog

Navigators Should Make Women Aware of Breast Density’s Effect on Cancer Risk

December 12, 2016 | AONN+ Blog | Breast Cancer
Featuring:
Lillie D. Shockney, RN, BS, MAS, HON-ONN-CG
Lillie D. Shockney, RN, BS, MAS, HON-ONN-CG
Editor-in-Chief, JONS; Co-Founder, AONN+; University Distinguished Service Professor of Breast Cancer, Administrative Director, The Johns Hopkins Breast Center; Director, Johns Hopkins Cancer Survivorship Programs; Professor of Surgery and Oncology, JHU School of Medicine; Co-Creator, Work Stride-Managing Cancer at Work

Despite research being conducted and confirmed on the significance of breast density, most women don’t know that having dense breasts increases their risk for breast cancer and reduces a mammogram’s ability to detect cancer, according to a University of Virginia (UVA) School of Medicine study.

A random phone survey of 1024 Virginia women ages 35 to 70 years, conducted by the UVA Center for Survey Research, found that only 1 in 8 women were aware that breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer, whereas 1 in 5 women knew that dense breasts reduced the sensitivity of mammograms to find tumors.

“It is important for women to know whether or not their own breast density is classified into one of the two high-density categories since this will increase their breast cancer risk,” said study co-author Wendy Cohn, PhD, an associate professor in UVA’s Department of Public Health Sciences. “Women need to know whether their breast density will make it harder to detect breast cancer so that, along with their healthcare team, they can consider other options for screening and detection.”

Virginia is among at least 27 states that require radiologists to tell women about their breast density, according to the study, and providing that information improves women’s understanding of how breast density may impact their health.

The survey found that the strongest factor in knowing about breast density and its relationship with breast cancer was whether a healthcare provider had informed a woman about the density of her breasts. UVA researchers stressed the importance of a conversation between patients and healthcare providers about the impact of breast density.

“The most important thing that doctors and patients can take away from this study is that the required written notice about breast density isn’t enough in itself: patients need to talk with their providers about what breast density means for each woman’s individual breast cancer risk,” said Thomas Guterbock, a professor of sociology and director of the UVA Center for Survey Research.

Sources:

Journal of the American College of Radiology, online edition, September 24, 2016.

University of Virginia School of Medicine (www.healthsystem.virginia.edu).

Related Articles
Planned Pregnancy for Patients with Breast Cancer
Lillie D. Shockney, RN, BS, MAS, HON-ONN-CG
July 13, 2021 | Navigation and Survivorship News | Insights into Navigation
Some patients with cancer may choose to become pregnant before they die. As their nurse navigators and patient navigators, we need to assist in considering the ethics and possibilities of this choice.
As Mask Mandates Lift, Patients Need to Take Precautions
Lillie D. Shockney, RN, BS, MAS, HON-ONN-CG
June 22, 2021 | Navigation and Survivorship News | Insights into Navigation
While COVID-19 may feel like it’s coming to an end for some, patients with cancer who haven’t gotten the vaccine need to continue to take extra precautions.
Hospice Care: Giving Patients Control Over End of Life
Lillie D. Shockney, RN, BS, MAS, HON-ONN-CG
June 14, 2021 | Navigation and Survivorship News | Insights into Navigation
Hospice care often doesn’t occur until a patient is too ill to continue treatment. Encouraging patients to seek hospice care earlier could lead to a better quality of life and preparation for end of life.

Report Broken Links

Have you encountered a problem with a URL (link) on this page not working or displaying an error message?

Help us fix it! Report broken links here.

Report Broken Link

Thank You to Our Corporate Sponsors and Alliance Partners!

  • Patron Corporate Sponsor

    Patron Corporate Sponsor

  • Patron Corporate Sponsor

    Patron Corporate Sponsor

  • Patron Corporate Sponsor

    Patron Corporate Sponsor

  • Patron Corporate Sponsor

    Patron Corporate Sponsor

  • Patron Corporate Sponsor

    Patron Corporate Sponsor

  • Industry Relations Council Member

    Industry Relations
    Council Member

  • Industry Relations Council Member

    Industry Relations
    Council Member

  • Health System Partner

    Health System Partner

  • Health System Partner

    Health System Partner

  • Health System Partner

    Health System Partner